pharmaceutical industry

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Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez is Dead. And it’s Business As Usual for Cancer

Published August 26, 2015 by Maryanne

Dr. GonzalezDr. Gonzalez with patient, Suzanne Sommers

Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez was a visionary; a holistic cancer treatment pioneer. He treated cancer patients, including actress Suzanne Sommers, with pancreatic enzymes and natural compounds. According to his website (http://www.dr-gonzalez.com/index.htm),  in addition to  cancer, his individualized nutritional regimens also helped Lyme, allergies, autoimmune disorders and chronic fatigue. And he had over 30 years research and clinical experience.

On July 21, 2015, Gonzalez died an untimely death. It was in his home and sudden. Until then he had been in excellent health. And while further tests may determine the cause of his death, autopsy reports do not support the original belief that he may have died of a heart attack.

Dr. Gonzalez was just one of 10 alternative holistic doctors found dead at home this summer.

In a recent article by Rajie Kabli for Collective Evolution because of the doctor’s cutting edge work, he told Vitality Magazine, “I’ve been told drug companies know about my work but hope I get hit by a bus.”

Was it coincidence that he was found dead not too long after this statement — or foul play? I remember reading on his patient Suzanne Sommers’ Face Book page that his death was in question.

Now … please hear my voice. I am just the voice of a mere journalist who had a great passion for health. But putting two and two together makes me believe foul play also.

Back in 2010 I had a health column, which appeared in an online local publication. My column was called “Here’s to Your Health.” I had some of the most inspiring interviews: my niece, who struggled with juvenile diabetes; Scott Schiaffo, actor from Kevin Smith’s “Clerks” who struggled with heart disease; two men who suffered from male anorexia; and supermodel Oleda Baker.

All was fine and good. My editor said that I was the best writer on staff and he wished he had at least three more with my talent. He even gave me a pay raise, which is very unusual for local news online publications.

Then I interviewed Dr. Nicolas Gonzalez and the shit hit the fan.

After I submitted my article, I got an email from my editor. He went ballistic. No, it wasn’t my grammar. It wasn’t a poorly written article. There was nothing wrong with my article and the editor gave no other explanation of why he wouldn’t print it other than, “I want to go back to a local angle.” He wanted me to write about local health food stores and local health restaurants. But the town I was representing for the online local newspaper had neither!

When I brought this to the attention of the editor, he sent me the most angry email I’ve ever received in my life. He said he was going to ban my health column indefinitely.

With that I took the high road and told him I would no longer be writing for his publication and that he dare not use my column tag, “Here’s to Your Health,” as I had it copy written (and still use it today for my lectures on holistic health).

Even though I stood up for myself, I felt defeated and embarrassed. In my undeserved shame I immediately deleted the negative email threads, along with the interview with the late, great, Dr. Nicholas Gonzalez. My amazing interview was gone, but I will always remember how highly Dr. Gonzalez spoke of his patient Suzanne Sommers. She was the main focus of the article. He couldn’t say enough good about her.

I shared what happened with a good friend who is very much into nutrition — so much so that Gary Null was his nutritionist. His comment, right off the bat, was that the media does not want to hear about a cure for cancer.

That also reminded me of what Lydia Lunch had said in one of her spoken word performances: “CANCER IS BIG BUSINESS.”

At the time, almost six years ago already, I pushed those thoughts to the side. I chalked my experience up to the editor having a bad day and taking it out on me. Because, being naive, I thought,  How could it be possible that people wouldn’t want to hear good news — that cancer is just as reversible as type 2 diabetes? Why was my article with an innovative doctor such a no-no? 

Now, six years later, and six years more cynical, it all makes sense. The cancer factory makes far too much money for any holistic health care practitioner to present a cure to the general public. My editor knew not to bring such a story to a small town media engine. He didn’t want to take a chance and pay the “price.” Who knows, perhaps he would have gotten fired. Instead of reasoning and telling the truth, he decided instead to belittle me and rip me a new asshole. And at the time I fell for it.

Now that more truths are coming out, I beg to question as many others do: Is there a pharmaceutical mafia?

Yes, I believe so.

In the 2013 book by Peter Gotzsche,”Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma Has Corrupted Healthcare,” Gotzche is fair enough to say that some do benefit from drugs, but the failure of the system as a whole.

It’s absolutely criminal that the war against curing cancer is almost as tough as the fight against cancer itself. An innovative pioneer is dead, and it’s business as usual for cancer.

For more information, just published today: http://healthimpactnews.com/2014/the-cancer-industry-is-too-prosperous-to-allow-a-cure/

 Maryanne Christiano-Mistretta is an award-winning journalist, author and public speaker. To have her speak at your event, contact her at: maryannechristiano@gmail.com for pricing and availability. She will travel for the right price.

Mother’s Little Helper

Published May 10, 2015 by Maryanne

mother's little helperGood chemistry!

Croatian born, Polish-American chemist Leo Sternbach was the man responsible for discovering benzodiazepines — the main class of tranquilizers. He is credited with the discovery of diazepam (Valium) as well as chlordiazepoxide (Librium), flurazepam (Dalmane), nitrazepam (Mogadon), flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), clonazepam (Klonopin) and trimethaphan (Arfonad).

Valium, also known as “Mother’s Little Helper” was a big inspiration for pop culture. The Rolling Stones did a song, “Mother’s Little Helper” to praise the drug. And the novel “Valley of the Dolls” was inspired by the drug. Valium was released in 1963 and was the most popular prescription drug in America. Over 2.3 billion doses were sold during it’s peak year in 1978.

Leo Sternbach told me himself — first hand — he did not like the way pop culture glorified the drug. I had the honor to interview this legendary inventor when I worked at The Montclair Times. Mr. Sternbach was living in Montclair (where he had been living since the 1940s!) His wife had to help with the interview because he was hard of hearing — as he was in his 90s when I interviewed him!

Shortly after our interview he moved to North Carolina where he died in 2005 at the age of 97. (He worked until he was 95).

Leo Sternbach  received his doctoral degree in organic chemistry from the Jagiellonia University in Krakow, Poland. He worked for Hoffmann-La Roche in Basel, Switzerland, which helped him flee to the United States in 1941 to escape Nazis (his family was Jewish) as he was able to work in the Nutley, New Jersey division of Hoffmann-La Roche.

He held 241 patents and his discoveries helped Hoffman-La Roche excel in the pharmaceutical industry.

Leo Sternbach is in the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame and right before he died, he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

Leo_SternbachLeo Sternbach, inventor of Valium

valley of the dolls

Sternbach told me he did not like how Valium was glorified in pop culture

Mother’s Little Helper Lyrics

“Mother’s Little Helper” (written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richard)

What a drag it is getting old
“Kids are different today,”
I hear ev’ry mother say
Mother needs something today to calm her down
And though she’s not really ill
There’s a little yellow pill
She goes running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper
And it helps her on her way, gets her through her busy day
“Things are different today,”
I hear ev’ry mother say
Cooking fresh food for a husband’s just a drag
So she buys an instant cake and she burns her frozen steak
And goes running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper
And two help her on her way, get her through her busy day
Doctor please, some more of these
Outside the door, she took four more
What a drag it is getting old
“Men just aren’t the same today”
I hear ev’ry mother say
They just don’t appreciate that you get tired
They’re so hard to satisfy, You can tranquilize your mind
So go running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper
And four help you through the night, help to minimize your plight
Doctor please, some more of these
Outside the door, she took four more
What a drag it is getting old
“Life’s just much too hard today,”
I hear ev’ry mother say
The pursuit of happiness just seems a bore
And if you take more of those, you will get an overdose
No more running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper
They just helped you on your way, through your busy dying day