wendy o. williams

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“Guest List” Reading at Rock ‘n’ Paws Benefit for ASPCA

Published June 15, 2014 by Maryanne

SAM_4917Rock ‘n’ Paws

Congratulations to Ashley Valentine and Nataly Patino for hosting a most awesome event, “Rock ‘n’ Paws” Saturday, June 14, at 10th Street Live in Kenilworth, New Jersey.

I’m honored that Ashley invited me to read from my book “On the Guest List: Adventures of a Music Journalist” which features stories about the late Wendy O. Williams of The Plasmatics who was a vegetarian and Joan Jett, an animal rights activist.

I’ve been a vegetarian since 1986 and shopping cruelty free since 1996.

It was an amazing event with a lot of great music! My favorite original band of the evening was New Politicians, who resembled Interpol.

I sold copies of “On the Guest List” after my reading and donated portions of proceeds to ASPCA.

SAM_4889Art for Animals!

SAM_4890I love my supportive husband!

SAM_4907Reading from “Guest List”

SAM_4913With gorgeous host, Ashley Valentine!

SAM_4919Thanks to this beautiful lady for buying two copies of “Guest List”!

SAM_4923With adorable co-host, Nataly Patino

A perfect night of mixing fun and pleasure — all for a good cause!

To donate to ASPCA visit: http://www.aspca.org/

To purchase copies of “On the Guest List Adventures of a Music Journalist” visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/162903908X

“On the Guest List” will be released later this month and sold on Amazon!

Published January 8, 2014 by Maryanne

Cover proof 4“On the Guest List” cover design by Darlene Foster

Well, the time has finally arrived! I found a publisher I am excited to be working with and “On the Guest List” will be released and sold on Amazon later this month (as a book only, I am not into Kindle, as to keep with the retro groove of the book and adventures in it!)

People are asking me about book release parties and author expos, etc. Not sure if that’s my scene as I view “On the Guest List” as more of a work of art, than a book, as it’s not coordinated by chapters, but by song titles. Some gave advice along the way, but I disregarded that and went with my heart. I am so happy I did so.

That said, I highly doubt I’ll be on the author’s circuit schmoozing and selling. “On the Guest List” is my precious muse and as Sid Vicious once said, “I did it my way.” And I will continue to do it “my way” thinking out of the box and coming up with ideas not to sell the most books, but to touch the most people who will connect with the book, no matter how big or small that circle is. Not to mention, there’s the whole anti-bullying angle, so I highly look forward to lecturing in schools and conventions about anti-bullying, as I do want to give back to the community as much as possible.

Like so many other generous people, I want to “save the world.” And if my book helps prevent JUST ONE bullied child from committing suicide, my work is done.

What I am thrilled about will be selling my books at Resintopia (http://www.resintopia.com/)  later this year, supporting my good friend Vin Bordogna who is the CEO and founder of the operation. When good people work together, nothing but good comes out of it — and that excites me to no end.

Enjoy the back cover pictured below.. This is the first time I posted it on this blog. Darlene Foster (http://www.darlenefoster.com/) went above and beyond the call of duty. And I’m honored beyond belief that I was able to score such positive endorsements from people whose work I’ve admired throughout my life!

Well, count down … it’s only a matter of weeks now!

back cover proof 2

Over the Rainbow

Published September 17, 2013 by Maryanne

over the rainbowSomewhere Over the Rainbow

An excerpt from my upcoming book, “On the Guest List”

Working in Montclair I soon discovered a unique health food store called Over the Rainbow – not to be confused with the nursery school of the same name.

Turned out, the owner, Bob Farina, was an old acquaintance, the Plasmatics fan. He didn’t remember me, even though I showed him some pictures of me as a teenager, over 20 years ago. I was now 38, but Bob thought I was only 24 so he had a hard time putting two and two together.

Bob Farina and his assistant Andy Loria were the salt of the earth. They kept their prices very low, which was unheard of in Montclair. They also fed the homeless and always sold cheap clothes for the homeless.

Over the Rainbow was like a shrine to the Plasmatics. Pictures of the late Wendy O. Williams, who died in 1998 due to a self-inflicted gun wound, were all over the place, including a copy of The Vegetarian Times, when Wendy O. was on the cover.

Bob shared with me that Wendy O. was the reason he got into health and she inspired him to open his store. Bob knew Wendy very well because he was not only known as the biggest Plasmatics fan, but he also did pyrotechnics for their live performances.

In addition to having all the Plasmatics memorabilia, Bob ran cool videos of movies such “The Wizard of Oz” and Laurel and Hardy flicks such as “March of the Wooden Soldiers” throughout the day. Bob also allowed a homeless woman to stay in his store during the cold winter months. He even set up a table and chair for her in the window store front.

It was so cool going to this bizarre punk rock luncheonette on a regular basis. This was something you just didn’t see – not even in New York City!

I decided it was a “must” to write an article about Bob Farina and Over the Rainbow for The Montclair Times. After my article was published, Bob offered me free lunches every day as a thank-you. I only accepted once. I wouldn’t possibly take another free lunch from a struggling business that often fed the homeless!

Bob said he loved the article, that it was well-written and accurate. “I’ll cherish the article,” he added.

I was honored.

I spent so much time at Over the Rainbow that Bob started ordering me around as if I worked there. It was hilarious! If it wasn’t, “Mare get the phone!” it was me teaching customers how to prepare seaweed, or putting napkins on the table. I would have loved to officially work there part-time if they were thriving as a business, but sadly they weren’t.

Within a year, Over the Rainbow went out of business.

I think the problem with Bob, as a business man, was that he was too honest, selling everything at cost. I brought shampoo there for $3 that would have cost $9 in another store.

After “Over the Rainbow” closed, I cringed at the thought of what stuffy, over-priced ugly “upscale” clothing store would replace the old spot.

I almost cried as I shook hands with Bob and Andy and said “good-bye.”

It was the end of something special, devastating, really. And I wondered, Where will the homeless lady go to eat now?